Think different

First, I know “think different” is bad grammar as it should be “think differently”, but it really says it, doesn’t it?

A few years ago, 1998 to be exact, Apple, Inc., (the then computer company) used this tag line in an advertising campaign and since then, bad grammar and all, I have used it as one of my favorite guiding principles. In one of the promotional elements the Apple campaign had this text:

“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them.  But the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They invent. They imagine. They heal. They explore. They create. They inspire. They push the human race forward”.

In 1998 I used this general idea to start my firm, IgniteThinking – a marketing, communications and market research small consultancy – encouraging my clients to think a bit sideways. I encourage them to use less traditional approaches to solve their business and communication issues. I am a strong believer that when you turn a problem on its head, no matter what it is: technical, scientific, personal or in business, you can think about it in a fresh different way, and that approach will help you come up with more options to deal with it. “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used to create them”, said Albert Einstein. I totally believe it!

As Dr. Blevins and I think about the Pituitary World News Community, how to use our collective neurons to get the word out and advocate for ideas that will lead to more early diagnosis, I often focus on the “think different” philosophy. “ My Story”, published in Pituitary World News a few weeks ago, focused on the fact that many organizations are trying to educate the world on pituitary disorders, but unfortunately the word isn’t getting out fast and efficiently enough.

In my research and marketing work we often provide the market insight for the development of new ideas. As we focus on a business or marketing issue we typically dig for as much existing information as we can possibly find. It’s messy. Lots of good and bad, confusing, undefined information that in the beginning makes little or no sense at all. Then, as we try to understand what we have, and we start distilling it into smaller more reliable bites, we ask lots of questions. Have no doubt, great questions lead to great ideas and innovation! They are disruptive, they don’t have easy answers and they make people think hard about what is important.

And that is my challenge to you! We want to include anyone who wants to participate in workshops to help us develop great questions so we can come up with new ideas to spread the word about pituitary disorders as quickly and efficiently as possible. We can do these workshops sessions online and anyone who is willing can participate.

So, if you are interested, let us know through Facebook or drop us an email at the Pituitary World News website and we’ll go from there.

We hope to hear from all of you and you’ll soon hear from us.

 

 

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4 COMMENTS

  1. I’m not sure if this is the type of question you are looking for, but I’ve wondered how lupus did it. How did a disease that only afflicts approximately 5% of the population go from being something the vast majority of the general population had never heard of to a disease that everyone has heard of and most have some idea of what it is?

    • Thank you Kristi. That’s an excellent question and well worth looking into. We will add it to our workshop for discussion. I hope you will participate. I’ll keep you informed on the timing. JD

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