Tulane University study aims to understand acromegaly physician/patient treatment perception gaps

A current study from Tulane University is attempting to study aspects of the management of acromegaly patients and their perceptions of treatment.

The study is being conducted by Dr. Lizheng Shi.  Dr. Shi has been interested in patient-reported experience and outcomes associated with acromegaly systems and treatments.  His previous studies have explored the barriers to and gaps in current medication treatments for acromegaly, from the viewpoints of patients. In this new study, he would like to further compare patient’s experience, perceptions, and preferences with those that are reported by the treating physicians.  Dr. Shi mentioned this is a lifestyle experience project where patients are asked to report perceptions of current treatment and symptoms.

The criteria for participation in the study follows:

At least 18 years of age.  Currently on a stable dose of an injectable somatostatin analogue such as octreotide LAR (Sandostatin® LAR) or lanreotide (Somatuline® Depot) for 12 months or longer. You may use them in combination with pegvisomant (Somavert®) or bromocriptine or cabergoline. Able to read and understand English. Live in the United States

You are not eligible if you are:
Currently on pasireotide (Signifor®)
Currently on pegvisomant (Somavert®) alone as monotherapy
Currently or previously enrolled in a Mycapssa® (octreotide capsules) trial
As part of this study, we are asking eligible individuals with acromegaly to complete a one-time online survey.
It is important to note you will also be asked to provide the contact information for your doctor that treats your acromegaly. Your responses will not be shared with your doctor.  There is a $75.00 reward to participate.
Please click on the link below to get more information and see if you are eligible to participate.
Thank you!
 
About Dr. Lizheng Shi.

Lizheng Shi, Ph.D., MsPharm, has trained as a pharmacist (B.S. in pharmacy 1992, M.S. in pharmacy 1994) through Shanghai Medical University and Peking Union Medical College, respectively. He has also trained as an economist (M.A. in economics 1998, Ph.D. in pharmaceutical economics and policy 2001) through the University of Southern California. He is the Regents Professor and Vice Chair in the Department of Global Health Management and Policy at School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and Clinical Associate Professor in Department of Medicine (Section of Endocrinology) and Department of Psychiatry. He is the Director for Health Systems Analytics Research Center (HSARC). He is a member of editorial board for Pharmacoeconomics and Global Health Journal. He was the past President (2014-2015) of the Chinese Economists Society (CES).  Dr. Shi’s current research interest includes health technology assessment and health care quality, access, and evaluation. He is also interested in pharmacoepidemiology with a focus on safety issues in medication treatments and medical informatics to improve quality and safety of patient care.  He has published more than 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals and served as principal investigators (PI) and co-PI for more than 40 research grants and contracts from NIH, AHRQ, PCORI, and other public and private funding sources.

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1 COMMENT

  1. Is anyone doing a survey to track down what actually causes pituitary tumors? – I suspect it’s animal protein and I would love to find out if I’m right.

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